All tagged Mad Studies

Blank Space, Taylor Swift, and Borderline

Taylor Swift is a superb songwriter, but I believe her success is fundamentally dependent on her ability to cultivate a deeper and more nuanced persona than most. It’s an incredibly powerful tool, but it only works if she is in control of her own narrative. This is why the song Blank Space, the second single from 1989 released in 2014, is key to understanding Taylor. The rest of 1989 is excellent, sure, but this song is Important with a capital I. Blank Space is an acknowledgement of the separation between her public persona and her private self, the beginnings of an epic power struggle, and a glimpse into the gender politics of pop music.

All Gods Are Bastards

Lessons from various extreme states over the last few years, and from various migraine visions over the last year: 

1) The laws of thermodynamics apply to literally everything, including oppressive systems and social change. 
2) Insects are better than people.
3) Mushrooms are better than people and will save the planet.
4) The state is trying to killing us.
5a) All social constructs are gods 
5b) All gods are bastards

The Violence of Likeness Stigma

As psychiatric survivors, it is easy to see just how violent and oppressive unlikeness stigma can be. The notion that we are fundamentally different from everyone else and that our behavior is controlled by a distinct biological entity that needs to be cured or treated for our and others’ safety has been used to justify overt, state-sanctioned acts of violence against us - and to silence us from speaking out about these forms of violence - for decades. Unlikeness stigma is what leads to us being locked up, forcibly drugged, electroshocked, restrained, secluded, etc. A great deal of critical psychiatry work revolves around challenging unlikeness stigma whenever possible, and I wholeheartedly support those efforts.

But too often, I have seen the psychiatric survivors community fall into arguments based on likeness stigma. And that is completely understandable. After hearing that one is “mentally ill” and needs to be “fixed” via drugs or ECT, it is comforting to hear that one can instead alter their behavior without medicalization, by just taking responsibility and thinking differently.